This free mindfulness training for parents of children experiencing anxiety aged 3-7, and is based on the Gold Coast. The training is part of a study at Griffith University Gold Coast examining the effectiveness of mindfulness training for reducing parent stress. Download the flyer for for information here: KIM_A5_flyer What is the aim of the project? Parenting can be stressful and can be even more challenging when children experience anxiety and worries. Anxiety disorders are among the most common mental health disorders affecting children. In Australia, 7% of children and adolescent between 4 to 11 years of age experience an anxiety disorder. In children, anxiety disorders are among the earliest mental health disorders to onset, cause significant distress and impairment and predict the development of other mental health disorders and substance use problems later in life. Mindfulnesstraining for parents has been shown to be an effective intervention for helping parents of children experiencing Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). It has been shown to reduce parent’s stress, anxiety and depression and to also lead to improvements in children’s behaviour, attention, and concentration. However, there is little research evaluating mindfulness training for parents of young children with anxiety disorders. Our research trial study will explore the effects...

This article from PANDA is an excellent resource to help parents manage emotional wellbeing when affected my natural disasters, global crisis or concerns for the future. *********** Reactions to disaster and other crises Natural disasters and other major global crises like viral epidemics, wars or acts of hate can have major and long-lasting impacts for many people. These can reach far beyond the individuals, families and communities directly affected by the events themselves and can last for a significant period of time. People may react in different ways to traumatic events, and sometimes the true impacts may not appear for some time. Those directly affected by a disaster or crisis may be injured or ill or feel grief from the loss they have endured. They may also experience shock, difficulty sleeping, inability to focus or plan ahead, be overwhelmed, feel unsafe or constantly replay the traumatic event in their minds. Climate change and the effect it will have on our planet is another long-standing and common concern for many. Anxieties related to climate change can build up over time leading to the erosion of a person’s belief in what the future holds for themselves and their families. How it affects expecting and new parents Climate change, natural...

R U OK? Day on 12 September is run by an Australian non-profit suicide prevention organisation. They advocate using the slogan 'R U OK?' in conversation with others, to check on the mental health of family, friends and co-workers. To find out more, visit the website. Mental health is one of Australia's most significant health issues, with almost half of the population experiencing mental illness at some point in their lives. Furthermore, 54% of those experiencing poor mental health will not access any treatment.* These figures are alarming in their own right, often materialising into high suicide rates. As a society, we are facing an uphill battle when it comes to reducing the prevalence of such health conditions.   [caption id="attachment_16972" align="alignnone" width="300"] Image credit: RU OK Day[/caption]   *Source: Coviu.com...

Perinatal Anxiety & Depression Awareness (PANDA) Week was established by PANDA in 2005 to increase the community’s understanding of perinatal mental illness and to reduce stigma. The theme for PANDA Week 2019 (10-16 November) is ‘Let's Get Real’, because many people are still afraid to talk about perinatal anxiety and depression and there are still many misconceptions about these serious and common illnesses. Too many people don’t know the signs and symptoms, or where to seek help if they’re struggling. Too many people are afraid to reveal what they’re feeling or delay seeking help because of fear of being seen as bad parents. There’s a lot of baggage around mental health, and the mental health of expecting and new parents is no exception. We want expecting and new mums and dads and their families to feel they can be open and honest about their feelings. As a community, we need to ‘get real’ about perinatal anxiety and depression. This is what PANDA Week 2019 is all about. For more information about perinatal anxiety and depression, or to speak with Rosalind about challenges you may be experiencing as a parent, make contact here....

Anxiety is very common in the modern world, but despite its prevalence, it's a very powerful and unpleasant experience.