Most people experience adversity at some stage of their lives. But for some people there are certain experiences that may be harder to recover from. Some never recover from a traumatic experience, and their lives never return to normal. These people can experience Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). These traumatic events may involve people being threatened or experiencing terrible harm, or horrible events that make people feel terrified and helpless. These events can be man-made, such as war, torture and other terrible traumas, or it may be after being exposed to the full force of a natural disaster where people are helpless and unable to fend for themselves. How do I know if I, or someone I’m worried about, has PTSD? Someone with PTSD will feel like their nerves are shot and they are forever marked by the unthinkable experience they endured. Their daily lives and relationships are affected. Specific symptoms of PTSD can include:  Re-experiencing the trauma, with no control over when or where.  These are strong flashbacks to the event, literally reliving it over and over, as if they were there all over again. These will often be accompanied by physical symptoms such as sweating, a racing heart, trembling, or nausea.  On top of...

Most people experience some stress in our modern world. Stress can be either good or bad for you, work for you or against you. ‘Good stress’ stimulates us to go out and get things done. It gets us up and at things earlier, and can keep thought process on track for those activities that require extra input. So stress can be ok in safe amounts. ‘Bad stress’ is often called distress, or overload. We might perceive that a task is just too much, or we haven’t got what it takes, and we go into overdrive. This can happen in the workplace via unrealistic or rigid performance requirements, or bullying, or in private life with competing needs for our time and attention. If negative coping strategies are used and the distress is not dealt with, stress builds upon itself and there can be long term negative psychological social and physical consequences. ‘Optimal stress’ is a healthy balance between ‘keeping busy’ “good” stress, and avoiding overload/distress. Rosalind helps clients to effectively manage their demands and increase their abilities to meet these demands. If you feel that you are being overwhelmed by stress and it is affecting your daily life, please contact Rosalind....